Virtual Satsang

Resources for the community of seekers

Malas

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  • The Mourners’ Kaddish: In the Jewish tradition, the Kaddish is traditionally said by sons to mourn their parents. For a recent episode of Heart and Soul Rabbi Naftali Brawer delves into the history and meaning of the Kaddish.

  • Your Life is your practice: In a recent column for Tricycle, Glenna Olmsted introduces the concept of a “working retreats”, and provides a sample schedule of how to conduct one for yourself.

    … I don’t have to wait until life gets quiet, or until I’m retired with nothing else to do. Nor do I have to become a nun before I start doing retreat. That’s how I began doing “working retreats,” … My hope is that this way of doing retreat will take the resistance out of establishing a retreat habit for those who thirst to do retreat but can’t seem to find the time. The working retreat is not intended to take the place of solitary retreat. It is simply a way to overcome your hesitation to do retreat because you have a job, a business, or other ongoing responsibilities to attend to.

    One key to a successful retreat is setting your intentions. If your intentions are clear and focused, the work that you do while on your retreat will become another aspect of your meditation rather than a distraction. When doing a week or more of this type of retreat, try to plan that you have two days off from work, just like in the real world. That way you will end up with two full days of solitary retreat per week.

  • American Grace (How Religion Divides and Unites Us): Harvard Professor (and author of Bowling Alone) Robert Putnam uses survey data to provide an interesting glimpse into the state of religion in the U.S. Audio below:

  • Yogis, Ascetic, and Fakirs: Stunning images! I’m including one below, but do make sure you read Carol Horton’s post.

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Written by virtualsatsang

November 22, 2010 at 7:55 am

Posted in Art, Faith, Malas, Meditation

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